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"Look, that's my job. I catch you as you are. If your friends can't show you the truth about yourself, what good are they?"
―Dave Griffith to Luke Cage[src]

Dave "D.W." Griffith is a young man living in New York City. He sold film footage of the Battle of New York on the street. He became associated with Luke Cage and, after the fight between Luke and Diamondback, migrated his business opportunities at Pop's Barber Shop.

Biography

Incident Footage

"Hey, yo, my man, my man. All HD. Got it right here. Blu-ray, too, 'cause I'm nice like that. Tony Stark, the big blonde dude with the hammer, the old dude with the shield, the green monster, and I don't mean Fenway. You can't get better raw footage of the incident anywhere else than right here."
―Dave Griffith[src]

Dave Griffith was trying to sell his DVD's with footage of the Battle of New York on the streets of Harlem. When he noticed Luke Cage he tried to convince him to buy a copy, saying that he has it in HD and blu-ray. Even though Cage ignored him Griffith still did his best, stating that it is the best raw footage of the incident available.[1]

Search for Domingo Colon

"Look, I hear and see everything. The streets know what you've been up to. Everyone's talking about it. But I ain't no snitch."
―Dave Griffith to Luke Cage[src]

One day, while trying to sell DVDs with footage of the Battle of New York on the streets of Harlem, Griffith was approached by Luke Cage. Griffith recognized Cage as being "one of them". Griffith tried to make a deal with Cage, in which he and Farley would film the next time Cage would do something, and they both could make $4000 dollar. Cage ignored the proposal. Since Griffith hears and sees everything Cage asked him for help. At first Griffith was unwilling to give Cage information and be a snitch. Cage told Griffith that he just wanted to use his eyes. Griffith gave in and wanted to know who Cage was looking for, which turned out to be Domingo Colon. Griffith was able to give Cage the location.[2]

Menace

The evening of the Jackie Albini killing, Mariah Dillard organized a community meeting at Harlem's Paradise. The main subject of the meeting was the danger Luke Cage formed for Harlem. Griffith noticed Cage and Claire Temple walking towards the meeting. Griffith called out to Cage and handed him a poster on which Cage was called a menace. Griffith promised Cage to tell nothing. Griffith hopefully asked Cage if he was not going to the meeting. Cage told him he. When Cage walked away Griffith looked worried.[3]

Duel at Malcolm X Boulevard

During the Duel at Malcolm X Boulevard between Luke Cage and Diamondback the citizens of Harlem came out in force to support Cage. Among them were Dave Griffith and Farley. Farley used his camera to film the duel. At one moment Diamondback threw Cage out of the upstairs apartment. When Diamondback left the apartment via the front door Griffith told Farley to keep filming, while the two of them walked closer to the fight. Together with the other people on the streets Griffith began to cheer his name, which powered Cage into taking Diamondback down.[4]

New Businesses

"We got tour buses every other hour. This spot's world-famous now."
"Well, your videos don't make it easier. The brother can't eat a sandwich without you pointing a camera in his face."
"Look, I'm his Howard Bingham. I didn't choose Luke's life. Luke life chose me."
―Dave Griffith and Bobby Fish[src]

To be added

Meeting Iron Fist

"When someone comes after my friends, I make it my fight."
""I make it my fight." This white boy got swagger, yo."
"He's got to. He calls himself the Immortal Iron Fist."
"Yo, that's hot! This cat understands the power of a brand."
"See? Finally, somebody gets it."
Danny Rand, Dave Griffith and Luke Cage[src]

To be added

Heroin Epidemic

"Except for the Stokes, all these fools are neck-deep in the drug game, okay? They're guilty as sin. You should force all of them to use some."
"What's with you, man?"
"You didn't see what I saw. Plus my girl almost got hurt. No. No, man, it ain't okay."
―Dave Griffith and Luke Cage[src]

To be added

Purchasing Pop's Barber Shop

"When Ms. Hopson comes here, I'm giving her all the money I made selling this merchandise, and I'm taking over the lease of the barbershop. Because if this is the route that you're gonna go, you can come here and get your hair cut, but that's it. Can't talk shop around here. 'Cause this place is Switzerland. It has to be, and you know it."
―Dave Griffith to Luke Cage[src]

To be added

Personality

"First, god, niggas always wanna be famous. Dancin' in the end zones, slam dunk, all of that was invented before I was born, and I don't remember Malcolm or Martin turning down many interviews."
"That's 'cause they used publicity to communicate our message."
"Money is the message. Or it should be. Get paid, black man. Get yours. Everyone else is."
―Dave Griffith and Bobby Fish[src]

Griffith is a fairly excitable young man, who takes an active interest in the pursuits of his friend Luke Cage. He and his friend Farley are amateur filmmakers equipped with RED and Canon DSLR cameras, which they use to shoot footage of supernatural occurrences such as the Battle of New York or Cage's fight with Diamondback.

Although he may come across as obnoxious occasionally, he is loyal to his friends and those close to him. He cared about Pop's legacy as well, even going as far as to exile Cage from the barber shop when he gains ownership of Harlem's Paradise.

Equipment

  • Camera: Griffith, while on the streets of Harlem, carried around a camera that he, more than often, used to film many of the events that happen throughout the neighborhood, including the Incident and the duel between Diamondback and Cage. An avid fan of Luke Cage, he used his camera to record and distribute many of his heroics.

Relationships

Allies

Enemies

Appearances

Appearances of Dave Griffith

In chronological order:

Trivia

  • In the comics, D.W. Griffith was an audio-visual and film student that provided housing and aid to Luke Cage and allies.
  • Dave Griffth's nickname "D.W." ironically gives him the same name as filmmaker D.W. Griffith. Griffith's most famous film, The Birth of a Nation, is regarded as a groundbreaking and influential piece of cinema but is also controversial for its racist and stereotypical depiction of black people and its portrayal of the Ku Klux Klan as heroes.

Gallery

Screenshots

Promotional

References

External Links